Answering your questions on chiropractic treatment

If you are new to Chiropractic care, we understand you may have some questions. We are confident that we have the answers to your inquiries.

Below are the most commonly asked questions about a chiropractic treatment. Should you have additional questions please feel free to contact us .

Q. Is Chiropractic effective?

A. Scientific evidence proving that  chiropractic care works and is safe and effective is compelling. Many controlled and independent research studies have shown repeatedly that chiropractic care is safe and effective for treating low back pain, neck pain, headaches and other conditions related to the spine. Based on these scientific studies, chiropractic care should be the treatment of choice for most spinal problems.

Q. Why should I see a Doctor of Chiropractic?

A. From professional athletes to homemakers, engineers to electricians, children to seniors, chiropractic care has been the answer to improved health. Many people see a Doctor of Chiropractic for back, neck or joint problems, while others may seek relief from the pain caused by headaches. Still others find that regular visits to their chiropractor help keep them in peak condition for sports and other activities.

Q. What can I expect when I go to a chiropractor?

As a licensed practitioner, your chiropractor will do the following:

Chiropractors take an integrated and holistic approach to the health needs of their patients considering the physical, psychological and social factors. They provide care and support by reducing pain and disability and restoring function.

Q. Is every patient's treatment the same?

A. The treatment a patient receives is related to the specific condition diagnosed by the chiropractor, and will vary from person to person depending on each persons unique situation.

Q.  Is Chiropractic treatment ongoing?

A. The hands-on nature of chiropractic treatment is essentially what sends patients back to the chiropractor a number of times. To be treated by a chiropractor a patient needs to be in his or her office. A chiropractor may provide acute, preventative and/or maintenance care thus making a certain number of visits necessary.

Q. Is a neck adjustment safe?

A. There are reported cases of stroke associated with visits to medical doctors and chiropractors. Research and scientific evidence does not establish a cause and effect relationship between chiropractic treatment and the accurrence of stroke rather, recent studies indicate that patients may be consulting medical doctors and chiropractors when they are in the early stages of a stroke. In essence, there is a stroke already in process. However, you are being informed of this reported association because a stroke may cause serious neurological impariment or even death. The possibility of such injuries occurring in association with upper cervical adjustment is extremely remote.  

Q. What are the risks of chiropractic care?

A. While rare, some patients may experience short term aggravation of symptoms or muscle and ligament strains or sprains as a result of manual therapy techniques. Although uncommon, rib fractures have also been known to occur following certain manual therapy procedures.

There are rare reported cases of disc injuries identified following cervical and lumbar spinal adjustments, although no scientific evidence has determined such injuries are caused, or may be caused, by spinal adjustments or other chiropractic treatments.

There are infrequent reported cases of burns or skin irritation in association with the use of some types of electrical therapy offered by some doctors of chiropractic.

Q. How long do chiropractors go to school?

A. Your chiropractor is a primary contact provider just like your family physician, optometrist or dentist. You do not need a referral from your medical doctor to see a chiropractor. Today's graduating Doctors of Chiropractic have studied and trained in a college or university for at least seven years. Just like medical or dental students, they must first complete undergraduate study before applying for admission to a chiropractic college. Becoming a chiropractor requires a minimum of 4,500 hours of intense academic study including classroom instruction, clinical science and internship. During the course of their training, he/she will have studied the following three areas:

Q. Is Chiropractic part of the Health Care System?

A. Chiropractors in Saskatchewan are an integral and complementary part of the health care system. The non-surgical, drug-free healing approach of chiropractic provides benefit to the health of millions of people worldwide each year. Most chiropractic patients experience benefits such as pain relief and improvement in movement.

Extended Health Care: Private & Group Plans

Q. Is Chiropractic a Regulated Health Profession?

A. Like medicine and dentistry, chiropractic is a self-regulating profession, and each provincial chiropractic regulatory body has the authority to grant a license to practice chiropractic. There are Chiropractic Acts in all 10 provinces and the Yukon Territory which establishes a self-regulatory process which includes extensive testing for licensure. In all provinces, licensure requirements include university studies followed by graduation from an accredited chiropractic institution, and passing national and provincial board examinations. Maintenance of licensure requires ongoing continuing education.

Q. What if I've been injured in a car accident or on the job?

A. It is important that you consult with your family chiropractor as soon as possible regarding treatment for your injuries. The longer you wait, the longer it can take for treatment and recovery time. Remember, no referral is necessary from your family physician.

The Workers' Compensation Board (WCB) pays for the full cost of treatment for work related injuries. You may see your chiropractor first for the evaluation of your work injury.